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What to See Toronto

Pan Am Games: Panamania’s Winning Culture

WHILE ATHLETES FLEX THEIR MUSCLES IN COMPETITIONS THROUGHOUT THE PAN AM GAMES, PANAMANIA SEES 1,300-PLUS ARTISTS SHOWCASING THEIR CREATIVE PROWESS AND CAPTURE THE IMAGINATION OF CANADA AND THE REST OF THE AMERICAS. HERE ARE JUST A FEW OF THIS MONTH’S CONCERTS AND EXHIBITIONS TO WATCH OUT FOR.

The Gypsy Kumbia Orchestra plays Panamania on July 11 and 12 (photo: Adelaida Pardo)

The Gypsy Kumbia Orchestra plays Panamania on July 11 and 12 (photo: Adelaida Pardo)

PANAMANIA LIVE @ NATHAN PHILLIPS SQUARE
JULY 11 TO 26 The hub of Panamania includes live music from such artists as Lila Downs and Marianas Trench, as well as nightly victory celebrations and fireworks. Best of all, everything’s free!

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Pan Am Games: Neighbourhoods to Explore During Your Downtime

EVEN MULTI-SPORT FANATICS NEED AN OCCASIONAL BREAK FROM THE NEAR-CONSTANT COMPETITION DURING THE PAN AM GAMES’ 17 DAYS. A FEW HOURS SPENT EXPLORING THE HOST CITY’S MYRIAD NEIGHBOURHOODS IS JUST THE TICKET!

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La Cubana and Fonda Lola are among Toronto’s top Latin American restaurants (photos: Craig Moy)

Although they’re definitely the summer’s main event, the Pan American Games are hardly the only, well, game in town. Get the most out of your visit by setting aside some time—between checking out the basketball tournament, cheering on the triathletes and being wowed by wakeboarders’ stunts—to get to know Toronto’s compelling history, shopping hubs and cosmopolitan restaurant scene through these four downtown neighbourhoods.

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Vote for Your Fave Ceramicist at the RBC Emerging Artist People’s Choice Award Exhibition

FIVE CANADIAN CLAY ARTISTS VIE FOR THIS YEAR’S RBC EMERGING ARTIST PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD IN AN EXHIBITION AT THE GARDINER MUSEUM

RBC Emerging Artist People's Choice Award Gardiner Museum David R. Harper

David R. Harper’s three-part Settlement… installation of ceramic objects (photo: Gardiner Museum)

JUNE 18 TO AUGUST 30 The possibilities of clay as a visual medium go far beyond bowls, plates and figurines. Ceramicists today use their material to craft strikingly unique pieces that tell stories and address contemporary issues. Five such Canadian practitioners—who’ve been working professionally for seven years or less—are acknowledged in the RBC Emerging Artist People’s Choice Award exhibition at the Gardiner Museum. Examine, for example, David R. Harper’s natural history–influenced objects, or Veronika Horlik’s sculptural installation, which references deforested and burned woodlands, and then vote to help determine the artist most deserving of this year’s $10,000 prize. Voting ends on August 3, with the winner announced August 14.  —Craig Moy

 

• Gardiner Museum, 111 Queen’s Park, 416-586-8080; gardinermuseum.on.ca
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An L.A. Gallery Brings Andy Warhol to Toronto

ANDY WARHOL REVISITED, PRESENTED IN TORONTO BY LOS ANGELES’S REVOLVER GALLERY, ADDS EVEN MORE POMP AND CIRCUMSTANCE TO BLOOR STREET WEST

Andy Warhol Toronto Elizabeth Taylor Campbell's Soup Can

photos © 2015 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society, New York

JULY 1 TO DECEMBER 31 His subjects were some of the 20th century’s most famous figures, brands, objects and landmarks; the artist himself became as illustrious as all of them. Such is the importance of Andy Warhol’s screen prints, paintings, films and myriad other creative endeavours that he remains arguably as influential today as he was during his 1960s prime. And so, naturally, a survey boasting many of his best-known works is big news for art lovers and the uninitiated alike. Curated by Los Angeles’s Revolver Gallery, Andy Warhol Revisted features more than 120 of the celebrated artist’s prints and canvases, including his iconic Campbell’s Soup Cans and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, Elizabeth Taylor, Mickey Mouse and more. Adding to the immersion, the exhibition is also expected to incorporate design elements reflecting Warhol’s Factory studio.  —Craig Moy

• Andy Warhol Revisted, 77 Bloor St. W.; warholrevisited.com

Discover the Americas at the Art Gallery of Ontario

THE ART GALLERY OF ONTARIO CRISS-CROSSES CONTINENTS IN A VISUAL EXPLORATION OF THE AMERICAS

Art Gallery of Ontario Picturing the Americas

Félix Emile Taunay’s Baia de Guanabrara Vista de Ilha das Cobras (photo: Instituto Ricardo Brennand)

JUNE 20 TO SEPTEMBER 20 It’s never been easier to travel the length (and breadth) of the Western hemisphere—from Alaska to Newfoundland to the Gulf of Mexico, Brazil and far beyond—but how closely do we really look at where we’re going? Just in time for July’s Pan Am Games, the Art Gallery of Ontario presents “Picturing the Americas,” an exhibition of landscapes that capture not only scenic vistas, but also the history, politics, culture and traditions associated with places like Rio de Janeiro’s Guanabara Bay, California’s Sierra Nevada mountains, Canada’s far north and the Tierra del Fuego in southern Chile and Argentina. The display boasts approximately 80 exquisite works in all—more than enough to inspire some serious wanderlust. —Craig Moy

• Art Gallery of Ontario, 317 Dundas St. W., 416-979-6648; ago.net
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New Works by Yoakim Bélanger at Thompson Landry Gallery

QUEBEC ARTIST YOAKIM BÉLANGER’S NEW PAINTINGS ON METAL, TO BE HUNG AT THOMPSON LANDRY GALLERY, COMBINE ABSTRACTION AND FIGURATION

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Yoakim Bélanger’s Red (photo: Thompson Landry Gallery)

JUNE 18 TO JULY 7 The word “convergence” springs to mind when contemplating the works of Yoakim Bélanger. The merging of colour and texture, of medium and subject, of figuration and abstraction are evident in his latest large-scale efforts to be shown at the Distillery District’s Thompson Landry Gallery. The Montreal-based artist uses found pieces of aluminum and oxidized steel for his canvases. His brushwork, sensitive to the scratches, chips and markings that have accumulated on the metal, brings forth images that highlight the expressive, evolving qualities of the human form. The works’ reflective surfaces mean that the viewer becomes part of the art, too, implicated in its creation—and interpretation—through the act of observing. —Craig Moy

• Thompson Landry Gallery, Distillery District, 416-364-4955; thompsonlandry.com
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Uncover Life in Ancient Pompeii at the Royal Ontario Museum

THE TREASURES OF THE ANCIENT ROMAN CITY OF POMPEII—DESTROYED BY A VOLCANIC ERUPTION—ARE UNEARTHED AT THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM

Royal Ontario Museum Pompeii

A pair of artifacts from the Royal Ontario Museum’s Pompeii exhibition (photos: courtesy of the Trustees of the British Museum)

JUNE 13 TO JANUARY 3 One of history’s most notorious natural disasters, the AD 79 eruption of Mount Vesuvius killed thousands of people and wiped the Roman city of Pompeii off the map. Though destroyed, the city was also preserved by the volcano’s molten lava and falling ash. Visitors to the Royal Ontario Museum can see what it was like to live in the shadow of Vesuvius, courtesy of a dramatic exhibition featuring 200 artifacts from the UNESCO World Heritage Site. Organized around the famed eyewitness account of the eruption by Pliny the Younger—as well as casts of Pompeians who died in the catastrophe—the highly anticipated show offers both a powerful reminder of nature’s volatility and a window to ancient Roman society.  —Craig Moy

• Royal Ontario Museum, 100 Queen’s Park, 416-586-8000; rom.on.ca
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Quick Pick: A Pair of Big-Name Shows at the Textile Museum

THE TEXTILE MUSEUM OF CANADA MAY SEEM SMALL RELATIVE TO ITS INSTITUTIONAL COUNTERPARTS IN TORONTO, BUT THIS SUMMER THE CLOTH-CONCENTRATING SPACE BOASTS SOME BIG NAMES

Textile Museum of Canada

Artist-designed fabric designs, clothing and more are now on display at the Textile Museum of Canada

MAY 2 TO OCTOBER 4 In “Artist Textiles: From Picasso to Warhol,” colourful pieces by those two icons—plus Dali, Matisse, Chagall and many others—trace a visual history of fabric acting as a unique creative medium for all manner of artists.

JUNE 10 TO SEPTEMBER 7 More than 50 works by photographer Nickolas Muray focus on the vibrant persona—and indeed, often quite imaginative wardrobe—of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo.

• Textile Museum of Canada, 55 Centre Ave., 416-599-5321; textilemuseum.ca
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Things to Do in Toronto: Shows & Events in June 2015

THERE ARE ALWAYS SO MANY THINGS TO DO IN TORONTO. GET OUT AND ENJOY SOME OF THE MANY GREAT PERFORMANCES AND EVENTS TAKING PLACE THROUGHOUT THE CITY IN JUNE!

THings to do in Toronto National Ballet of Canada

The National Ballet of Canada presents The Sleeping Beauty this month (photo: Aleksandar Antonijevic)

JUNE 6 & 7 A homegrown musical success story, Field Trip brings great tunes to the grounds of historic Fort York. The 2015 edition is headlined by Alabama Shakes and My Morning Jacket, but also offers a slew of other features, including top food vendors, art installations and a comedy stage. It’s a family-friendly weekend, too: kids 12 and under are free. Visit fieldtriplife.com to purchase tickets.

JUNE 10 TO 20 A good fairy and an evil one, a beautiful princess, a slumber-inducing prick of the finger, and a kiss that wakes an entire kingdom set the stage for The Sleeping Beauty. Presented by the National Ballet of Canada, the Rudolph Nureyev–choreographed production boasts romantic pas de deux and a splendid sarabande, as well as dances by Puss in Boots and the White Pussycat, all set to a Tchaikovsky score. The graceful 19th-century fairy tale remains one of ballet’s most revered works. The Ballet’s website, naturally, has additional details.

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3DXL Looks at 3D Printing’s Future

3DXL, A NEW OFF-SITE EXHIBITION CREATED BY THE DESIGN EXCHANGE, EXAMINES THE OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES OF 3D PRINTING, AND HOW IT COULD MAKE ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN MORE SUSTAINABLE AND ACCESSIBLE TO ALL

3DXL Design Exchange Toronto

MAY 14 TO AUGUST 16 When we talk about 3D printing, we tend to focus on its novelty—and occasionally its controversy: “Look over here! Someone’s printed a cartoony plastic doodad. And here’s a person who wants to print food! And over there, someone else has printed the components to a working rifle.” But that’s small-scale stuff. Arguably the most important use for the constantly evolving technology, however, is its ability to produce larger forms, from prosthetic limbs to furniture to entire buildings, all fully customizable and with little to no waste.

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25 Free Things to Do in Toronto with Kids

OUR ALL-SEASON GUIDE TO THE ABSOLUTE BEST LOW-COST AND FREE THINGS TO DO IN TORONTO WITH KIDS IN 2015.  BY CARA SMUSIAK

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Toronto is a fantastic city to explore with the whole family—especially as the weather starts to warm up. These 25 low-cost and free things to do in Toronto with kids offer many opportunities to get everyone outside, regardless of the season, though indoor activities abound, too, for days when the climate is uncooperative.

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At the Bata Shoe Museum, Heels Make the Man

IN A NEW EXHIBITION MARKING THE 20TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BATA SHOE MUSEUM, HEELS—PARTICULARLY THOSE WORN BY MEN—ARE A VERY BIG DEAL

Bata Shoe Museum heels

This “Justin” packer boot and Ferradini shoe—the latter once worn by Elton John—are among the artifacts on display in the Bata Shoe Museum heels-for-men exhibition (photos: Ron Wood)

STARTS MAY 8 The Bata Shoe Museum officially kicks off its 20th-anniversary year by doing what it does best: using footwear to provoke discussion about history, cultural norms and contemporary notions of identity. Its latest showcase, “Standing Tall,” looks at heeled shoes and boots, and how men have worn them over the last 400 years. Though today we may think of men wearing heels as a dramatic affectation—the purview of drag performers, for example—their march across time has been far more complex. Think of European aristocrats, whose heels literally conveyed their elevated status. Consider rock stars like Elton John and David Bowie, who wore flamboyant platform shoes on stage. Or take that symbol of hyper-masculinity, the cowboy, whose boot heels help him stay in the stirrups while on horseback. Their stories and many others are told through this unique exhibition’s heightened artifacts.  —Craig Moy

• Bata Shoe Museum, 327 Bloor St. W., 416-979-7799; batashoemuseum.com
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