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What to See Ottawa

Ottawa Summer: the A-Z Guide

By Chris Lackner

Know your ABCs. Our A-Z guide spells out Ottawa’s best summer attractions and activities.

A — Art: The National Gallery of Canada. Come for the giant spider sculpture, stay for the dynamic art — and the Picasso. Until Sept. 5, The National Gallery of Canada’s treasured collection of Picasso’s line drawings is being exhibited. Picasso: Man and Beast takes viewers into the psychic labyrinth of Picasso’s mind, presenting — for the first time in almost 60 years — the artists’ works around such themes as love, lust, animal urges and violence.

The National Gallery of Canada.

The National Gallery of Canada.

B – Bonnechere Caves: 50 million years old and waiting for you to explore in Eganville!

C – Casino du Lac-Leamy: Win, lose or draw, stay for the entertainment and dining options, including Le Baccara and Arôme.

D — Diefenbunker: An underground Cold War museum and the “world’s largest escape room.” 

E – Eco-OdysséeWakefield’s water maze; encounter beavers instead of Minotaurs.

F – Central Experimental Farm: Includes a tropical greenhouse, wildlife and ornamental gardens, and a 64-acre Arboretum.

Ottawa's Central Experimental Farm.

Ottawa’s Central Experimental Farm.

G – GreekFest: Ouzo, spanakopita and the zorba dance, anyone? From Aug. 11-21. 

H – The Hill: Explore Parliament with guided tours of Centre Block and East Block. 

I – International Chamberfest (July 21 to Aug. 3) + International Buskerfest (July 28 to Aug. 1): Chamberfest offers intimate, beautiful venues with great acoustics and even better variety. Yes, there will be classical music small ensembles – but also street music, electronic music, children’s shows, jazz, multimedia, and medieval chants. As for Buskerfest, this free Sparks Street festival attracts street performers – musicians, acrobats, contortionists and more! – from Canada and around the world.

Parliament Hill offers guided tours.

Parliament Hill offers guided tours.

J – Go directly to Ottawa Jail Hostel: Boo! Tour the ghostly former jail as part of a Haunted Walk tour. 

K – Kayaking: Dow’s Lake Pavilion rentals also include canoes and paddleboats. 

L – Leamy Lake Park beach: Who new Ottawa-Gatineau was a beach vacation? This sandy Gatineau haven is one of the many places to beat the summer heat. For Where Ottawa’s complete area beach guide, follow this link to sand and sunshine.

M – Market: Hot spots include the ByWard Market Square and the resto patios of Clarendon Court.

The Nordik Spa in Chelsea, Que.

The Nordik Spa in Chelsea, Que.

N – Nordik-Spa Nature: Spa time at the edge of Gatineau Park!

O – Ottawa Champions: Take yourself out to the ball game for this optimistically-named minor-league team.

P – Lansdowne Park: The new destination for entertainment, shopping and dining anchors the Glebe, one of Ottawa’s trendiest hoods. 

Q – Quest (for quarts and pints). Brew Donkey delivers you to the suds with craft brewery tours.

R – Rideau Hall: Tour the home and workplace of Canada’s Governor General; special events include Storytime for children on Fri and Sat afternoons. 

Rideau Hall's Tent Room.

Rideau Hall’s Tent Room.

S – Soccer. The Ottawa Fury FC hopes to kick and head its way back to the North American Soccer League championship game, where they narrowly lost in 2015. Join some 24,000 fans at the revamped TD Place alongside the Rideau Canal. Stay for food, shopping and entertainment in Lansdowne Park and neighbouring streets in the Glebe.

T – Star Trek: Beam down to the Starfleet Academy Experience or beam up franchise anniversary coins from the Royal Canadian Mint.

U – Upper Canada Village: Time travel to the 1860s, but don’t stay for the winter. 

V – Velogo: The capital and its stunning bike paths are best explored via pedal.

W – Westboro: Come for pedestrian-friendly shopping, stay for the beach.

Little Ray's Reptile Zoo is a wild experience for all ages.

Little Ray’s is a wild experience for all ages.

X… marks the spot for Pirate Adventures on Mooney’s Bay, and picnics at nearby Hog’s Back Falls.

Y – Free Yoga on Parliament Hill (noon on Wednesdays). Twist your body, leave truth twisting to politicos.

Z – Little Ray’s Reptile Zoo: A snaky experience.

A Bug’s Life at the Canadian Museum of Nature

Beautiful photographs of beetles are on display at the Canadian Museum of Nature.

Beautiful photographs of beetles are on display at the Canadian Museum of Nature.

Beetles: they’re tiny, diverse, and stunningly beautiful. Their patterns and colours change from one carapace to the next, and Beetles Close-Up gives visitors a detailed look at this phenomenon through 18 large-scale photographs of specimens from the Canadian Museum of Nature’s collection. Created by a museum entomologist, the photographs are so intricate it’s possible to see individual hairs on each beetle’s leg — hairs that help scientists determine which species a beetle belongs to. On display at the Canadian Museum of Nature until September 2016. —Amy Allen
•Canadian Museum of Nature, 240 McLeod St., 613-566-4700. nature.ca
Map and reviews

Women’s Work at the Canadian War Museum

 

World War Women examines the contributions that women made to the war effort during both World Wars.

World War Women examines the contributions that women made to the war effort during both World Wars. (Photo: Library and Archives Canada, PA-108043)

Historically, men have been the ones fighting on the front lines, but that doesn’t mean women didn’t also play a role in global conflicts. In the First and Second World Wars, they sold stamps to raise money for the war effort, served as nurses in Europe, and worked in munitions and supply factories. The wars allowed them to prove their capabilities to themselves and to a society that tended to underestimate them. World War Women looks at some personal stories, including that of Molly Lamb Bobak, who served as a war artist during World War II, and Dorothy Linham, who won the coveted title of Miss War Worker in 1942. On at the Canadian War Museum until April 3. —Amy Allen
•Canadian War Museum, 1 Vimy Place, 1-800-555-5621. warmuseum.ca
Map and reviews

Blue Rodeo Gallops Into the Capital

Iconic Canadian band Blue Rodeo rolls into town on February 14. (Photo: Heather Pollock)

Iconic Canadian band Blue Rodeo rolls into town on February 14. (Photo: Heather Pollock)

FEB. 14 With a star on Canada’s Walk of Fame, 12 Juno Awards to their name, and more than three million records sold worldwide, Blue Rodeo is without a doubt one of Canada’s most enduring bands. Their alt-country rock songs are unmistakable — songs like the melancholy “Try” and the foot-tapping “Till I Am Myself Again”, which propelled them to the top of the charts in the ‘80s and ‘90s. They stop in Ottawa at the Canadian Tire Centre as part of their cross-Canada tour. —Amy Allen
•Canadian Tire Centre, 1000 Palladium Dr., 613-599-0100. canadiantirecentre.com

Reworking the Classics: 2Cellos

More commonly known as 2Cellos, Luka Sulic and Stjepan Hauser put unique twists on classical and contemporary music.

More commonly known as 2Cellos, Luka Sulic and Stjepan Hauser put unique twists on classical and contemporary music.

FEB. 14 Luka Sulic and Stjepan Hauser, the duo more commonly known as 2Cellos, met in their teens when they studied music in Croatia. At the time, they often competed against each other in music contests, and many saw them as rivals. But in 2011, when their paths crossed again after years of working in different cities, they decided to team up. Their cello version of Michael Jackson’s “Smooth Criminal” went viral when they uploaded it to YouTube, and they’ve been selling out stadiums with their unique take on pop songs and classical music ever since. —Amy Allen
•National Arts Centre, Southam Hall, 53 Elgin St., 866-850-2787. nac-cna.ca
Map and reviews

Comic Art in Large Scale

Mathew Reichertz's Garbage follows a man's interactions with his neighbours after a mysterious couch appears in front of his house. (Mathew Reichertz, Garbage, page 5 (2014), oil on Polystyrene, 8 x 6 feet. Courtesy of the artist; Mathew Reichertz, Garbage, Page 10 (2014), oil on Polystyrene, 8 x 6 feet. Courtesy of the artist.

Mathew Reichertz’s Garbage follows a man’s interactions with his neighbours after a mysterious couch appears in front of his house. (Mathew Reichertz, Garbage, page 5 (2014), oil on Polystyrene, 8 x 6 feet. Courtesy of the artist; Mathew Reichertz, Garbage, Page 10 (2014), oil on Polystyrene, 8 x 6 feet. Courtesy of the artist.)

The setting is a North Halifax neighbourhood. Leaving his house in the morning, a man discovers that a white couch has been placed anonymously on the curb outside his door, which sets off a series of encounters (some pleasant, other less so) with his neighbours. Mathew Reichertz’s Garbage, a large-scale comic book that blurs the line between narrative and art, explores the unhealthy relationships that sometimes occur within communities, and how simple communication can reveal the goodness in others. On display at the Carleton University Art Gallery until April 3. —Amy Allen
•Carleton University Art Gallery, St. Patrick’s Building, 1125 Colonel By Dr., 613-520-2120. cuag.carleton.ca
Map and reviews

Warm Winter Jazz

Juno Award-nominated artist Carol Welsman performs at the Ottawa Winter Jazz Festival.

Juno Award-nominated artist Carol Welsman performs at the Ottawa Winter Jazz Festival.

FEB. 4 TO 7 Two pianos, two keyboards, and a drum kit — these are the tools Mouse on the Keys use to create their haunting, jazz-influenced, experimental music. Based in Japan, the trio blends aspects of rock and roll with the gentler strains of classical, jazz, and funk. They’re just one of several bands performing at this year’s Ottawa Winter Jazz Festival. Other names, many of them from Ottawa, include John Geggie’s Journey Band, Montréal Guitare Trio, The Chocolate Hot Pockets, and Juno Award-nominated chanteuse Carol Welsman. —Amy Allen
ottawajazzfestival.com

Gallery Highlights Early Canadian Snapshots

Mirrors with Memory shines a light on early Canadian photography. (Thomas Coffin Doane, The Molson family brewery after the fire, Montreal, Quebec, 1858, daguerreotype, Library and Archives Canada.)

Mirrors with Memory shines a light on early Canadian photography. (Thomas Coffin Doane, The Molson family brewery after the fire, Montreal, Quebec, 1858, daguerreotype, Library and Archives Canada.)

Invented in the early 1800s, the daguerreotype is the prototype for photography as we know it today. Images were captured on a sheet of polished, silver-plated copper, allowing each detail to be preserved with pristine clarity. For the first time in history, humans could create images of themselves — and the world around them — as they really were. In Mirrors with Memory: Daguerreotypes from Library and Archives Canada, a series of landscapes and portraits of regular citizens open a window into Canada’s early days. On display at the National Gallery of Canada until February 28.
•National Gallery of Canada, 380 Sussex Dr., 613-990-1985. gallery.ca
Map and reviews

Winter Wonderland: Winterlude

BY AMY ALLEN

The 38th edition of Winterlude, Ottawa's celebration of ice and snow, runs from January 29 to February 15. (Photo: Canadian Heritage)

The 38th edition of Winterlude, Ottawa’s celebration of ice and snow, runs from January 29 to February 15. (Photo: Canadian Heritage)

In many cities across North America, winter is a time when people stay indoors, but not so in Ottawa. Winterlude is the city’s annual homage to all things ice and snow. This year, it runs from January 29 to February 15.

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Happily Never After: Matchstick at the GCTC

A lighthearted musical with dark undertones, Matchstick chronicles the life of a woman who is married to a very notorious man.

A lighthearted musical with dark undertones, Matchstick chronicles the life of a woman who is married to a very notorious man.

JAN. 21 TO 31 A girl from a poor country meets a boy from the land of opportunity. They fall in love, get married, and live happily ever after. That’s how the story always goes, right? In the case of Matchstick, not so much. Told through music, the play unravels the true-life tale of a woman who discovers she has married “one of the most hated men in the world.” As for the man’s identity? You’ll just have to see the play to find out. Part romance, part musical, part dark historical drama, Matchstick deftly walks the tightrope between comedy and tragedy. —By Amy Allen
•Great Canadian Theatre Company, 1233 Wellington St. W., 613-236-5196. gctc.ca

See the Wizard at the National Arts Centre

(Photo: Luk Monsaert)

The classic Wizard of Oz musical comes to the National Arts Centre. (Photo: Luk Monsaert)

DEC. 29 TO JAN. 3 The holidays are a great time for a getaway, so why not let yourself be transported to a different world? You won’t even have to leave Ottawa, we promise. Just in time for the New Year, The Wizard of Oz arrives at the National Arts Centre — join Dorothy, the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, and the Cowardly Lion as they travel the Yellow Brick Road, singing and dancing all the way. This production features songs from the movie, as well as new compositions by Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber.  —Amy Allen
•National Arts Centre, Southam Hall, 53 Elgin St., 866-850-2787. nac-cna.ca
Map and reviews

Life Lessons in Angel Square

Angel Square is a classic coming-of-age story by Ottawa writer Brian Doyle.

Angel Square is a classic coming-of-age story, adapted for the stage from the novel of the same name by Ottawa writer Brian Doyle.

DEC. 3 TO 20 The year is 1945. The Second World War has only just ended, and racial tensions are still present in the streets of Ottawa. Tommy, a young boy living in the seedy, multi-ethnic neighbourhood of Lowertown, is on a mission: to find the perpetrator of a savage crime against his best friend’s father. He conducts his investigation in Angel Square, where French, Irish Catholic, and Jewish kids constantly duke it out. Based on the beloved novel by Brian Doyle, this play tackles some difficult issues — namely, the dangers of racial prejudice, the struggles of the working class, and the awkward transition from childhood to adolescence. But at its heart, it’s about learning to understand one another. —Amy Allen
•The Great Canadian Theatre Company, 1233 Wellington St. W., 613-236-5196. gctc.ca