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mirvish productions

Encore! Encore! Theatre, Opera, Ballet and Music Abound in Toronto

CANADA’S COMMERCIAL CAPITAL IS ALSO A CULTURAL ONE. THIS FALL BRINGS AN ABUNDANCE OF OFFERINGS—FROM BROADWAY MUSICALS AND TONY-WINNING DRAMAS TO MELODIOUS SYMPHONIES, OPERATIC ARIAS AND CLASSICAL DANCE. BY LINDA LUONG

The Book of Mormon. Photo by Joan Marcus.

The Book of Mormon. Photo by Joan Marcus.

IN THE HOOD

The Entertainment District, home to five major performing arts venues, is where much of the singing, dancing and music-making takes place. The area’s two pillar theatres, the Royal Alexandra (260 King St. W.) and Princess of Wales (300 King St. W.), are owned by Mirvish Productions, which regularly stages audience-friendly shows. The grandiose, beaux-arts-style Royal Alex boasts an autumn playbill that includes historical drama Our Country’s Good (continuing to October 26), about the penal colony originally established in Australia, as well as Tom Stoppard’s witty Arcadia (November 4 to December 14) and The Heart of Robin Hood (December 22 to March 1). By contrast, the 2,000-seat Princess of Wales was built in the early 1990s to host mega-musical Miss Saigon. Since then it’s been home to extravaganzas like The Lion King and The Phantom of the Opera. The religious satire The Book of Mormon (continuing to November 2) returns after its sold-out 2013 run.

A block east lies Roy Thomson Hall (60 Simcoe St.), home of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and host to Toronto International Film Festival galas. One of the city’s most distinctive landmarks, the concert hall is easily recognized by its curvilinear glass exterior. Within, its primary tenant—under the guidance of music director Peter Oundjian—presents innovative programming such as the contemporary-classical New Creations Festival and an annual celebration of Mozart, and has accompanied such guests as Yo-Yo Ma and Itzhak Perlman. This month sees David Zinman conduct Rachmaninoff’s Symphony No. 2 (October 2 and 4) and Prokofiev’s ballet score for Shakepeare’s Romeo & Juliet (October 22 and 23)—a powerful work. Later in the year, the harmonious efforts of the TSO and the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir in a rendition of Handel’s Messiah (December 16 to 21) is a holiday tradition not to be missed, and in 2015 Chinese piano prodigy Lang Lang celebrates Chinese New Year (February 21).

Not so far away is the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts (145 Queen St. W.). The country’s first purpose-built opera house opened in 2006 and is home to both the Canadian Opera Company and the National Ballet of Canada. Inspired by traditional European theatres, the five-tiered horseshoe-shaped auditorium boasts impeccable sight lines, an expansive orchestra pit plus an impressive lobby—featuring a “floating” glass staircase—that adds considerable glamour to the streetscape. Themes of love and romance dominate the COC’s 2014-15 season: Verdi’s comic Falstaff (October 3 to November 1) kicks things off, while Don Giovanni (January 24 to February 21) seduces patrons in the new year. When opera’s not on stage, dance takes the spotlight. Helmed by former prima ballerina Karen Kain, the National Ballet of Canada boasts a dynamic repertoire by 20th- and 21st-century masters ranging from Balanchine to Nureyev. James Kudelka’s rendition of family favourite The Nutcracker (December 13 to January 3)—complete with stunning sets and costumes—is a holiday classic; the whimsical Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (March 14 to 29) is a bold new work; and beloved classic The Sleeping Beauty (June 10 to 20) caps off the season.

For a night of laughs, improv comedy reigns at The Second City, which counts the likes of Gilda Radner, John Candy, Eugene Levy and Catherine O’Hara amongst its Toronto alumni. Performed in a cabaret-style theatre, the company’s Fall Mainstage Revue has audiences laughing with its sketches, humourous songs and zany cast.

Soulpepper Theatre Company's production of Dickens' A Christmas Carol. Photo by Cylla Von Tiedemann.

Soulpepper Theatre Company’s production of Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. Photo by Cylla Von Tiedemann.

DISTINCTIVELY CANADIAN

A hub for homegrown talent, Factory Theatre (125 Bathurst St.) was conceived in 1970 to reflect Canadian experiences, and continues to dedicate itself to producing works by this country’s playwrights. This fall, the curtains rise on The Art of Building a Bunker (October 16 to November 2; page 28), a satire about workplace sensitivity training written by Adam Lazarus and Guillermo Verdecchia. Later, Charlotte Corbeil-Coleman and Joseph Jomo Pierre’s Twisted (February 5 to 22) updates Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist, and Ronnie Burkett and his 40 eclectic marionettes return with The Daisy Theatre (March 18 to April 5).

The Young Centre for the Performing Arts (50 Tank House Ln.) anchors one end of the sprawling Distillery District. Primarily home to the artist-founded Soulpepper Theatre Company, the former industrial building features four stages as well as studio spaces. Each season, Soulpepper fulfills its mandate to present classical works within the context of our national culture, as exemplified by Spoon River (October 29 to November 15; page 29), a musical in which members of a rural town recount their lives through their own epitaphs. The following month sees the triumphant return of Kim’s Convenience (November 27 to December 28), Ins Choi’s debut play about Korean immigrants and their Canadian-born children in Toronto’s Regent Park, which just wrapped up a national tour. Simultaneously, Dickens’ quintessential holiday tale, A Christmas Carol (November 27 to December 27) is mounted.

True to its name, Canadian Stage presents modern works—sometimes written by Canucks and often national or Toronto premieres—at both the Berkeley Street Theatre (26 Berkeley St.) and Bluma Appel Theatre (27 Front St. E.). Helen Lawrence (October 12 to November 1), fuses computer-generated simulation, live action film and visual art in a post‑World War II drama set in Vancouver. After a successful run last season, the sexually charged Venus in Fur (December 18 to 28) is back by popular demand, while beloved Quebec theatre artist—and CanStage fave—Robert Lepage returns with his heart-wrenching Needles and Opium (May 1 to 10).

Another local incubator, the playwright-in-residence program at Tarragon Theatre (30 Bridgman Ave.) has produced works by the likes of Morris Panych, Daniel MacIvor, Judith Thompson and Hannah Moscovitch. This season’s lineup includes The Bakelite Masterpiece (October 21 to November 30), in which an art forger is forced to recreate a painting by Dutch master Vermeer, as well as Panych’s Sextet (November 5 to December 14), which delves into secrets and desires of six stranded musicians. The new year brings both hope and fear for the hospital-bound characters of Waiting Room (January 6 to February 15).

Koerner Hall auditorium at The Royal Conservatory. Photo by Tom Arban.

Koerner Hall auditorium at The Royal Conservatory. Photo by Tom Arban.

TUNEFUL SPACES

Toronto’s top concert halls juxtapose old and new. Since breaking ground in 1893, the venerable Massey Hall (178 Victoria St.) has hosted performers spanning generations and genres: George Gershwin, Maria Callas, Oscar Peterson, Dizzy Gillespie, Bob Dylan, Gordon Lightfoot, Ronnie Hawkins, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell and Justin Bieber. This month sees contemporary artists grab the mic, including David Gray (October 7), Jason Mraz (October 8 and 9) and Chrissie Hynde (October 30). Then Gordon Lightfoot enjoys a four-night residency (November 26 to 29) before seasonal staples like Sing-Along Messiah (December 21) and New Year’s Eve Comedy Extravaganza (December 31) fill the room.

Koerner Hall (273 Bloor St. W.) is a much more recent vintage. Completed in 2009, the musical jewel of The Royal Conservatory is a visual and sonic stunner: a ribbon of curved oak beams creates the illusion of a canopied ceiling while helping to enhance the venue’s superb acoustics. The 1,135-seat auditorium hosts an array of jazz, pop and world musicians including Rafal Blechacz (October 19), Sir James Galway and Lady Jeanne Galway (October 25), Ana Moura (November 5), Idan Raichel and Vieux Farka Touré (November 21), Handel’s Messiah performed by the Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and Choir (December 17 to 20), and Anne Sofie von Otter and Angela Hewitt (January 9).

MORE TO SEE THIS FALL

Cirque du Soleil's Kurios--Cabinet of Curiosities. Photo by Martin Girard.

Cirque du Soleil’s Kurios—Cabinet of Curiosities. Photo by Martin Girard.

Big Top Spectacle The circus is in town! Montreal’s famed Cirque du Soleil has once again pitched its signature blue and yellow tents down at the Port Lands (51 Commissioner St.). In Kurios—Cabinet of Curiosities (continuing to October 26), a kaleidoscope of characters—and the talented acrobats, jugglers, cyclists, cortortionists and other artists who portray them—transport audiences to the 19th century to meet an inventor who’s able to defy time, space and gravity. (One spectacular scene occurs at an upside down dinner party, while another features an invisible circus.) With imaginative costumes by Phillippe Guillotel and detailed sets and props by Stéphane Roy, Kurios is one of the company’s most imaginative and visually striking shows.

Jersey Boys. Photo by Jeremy Daniel.

Jersey Boys. Photo by Jeremy Daniel.

More Blockbusters Also part of the Mirvish empire is the Ed Mirvish Theatre (244 Victoria St.), a former vaudeville and motion picture house across from the Toronto Eaton Centre. Carefully restored to reflect its Roaring ’20s origins, the venue’s grand staircase and ornate vaulted ceilings set a resplendent scene as patrons arrive for stagings of Wicked (continues to November 2), Jersey Boys (December 17 to January 4) and the endearing musical Once (February 10 to April 12).

Medieval Times, Toronto

Medieval Times

Loyal Subjects For dinner and a show, the live spectacle that is Medieval Times can’t be missed. Join King Don Carlos’s court and watch as knights battle to win the hand of his daughter, Princess Catalina—all while partaking in a four-course (and utensil-free) feast.

Now in Toronto, The Book of Mormon Boasts Broadway Blasphemy

The Book of Mormon (photo: Joan Marcus)

The Book of Mormon (photo: Joan Marcus)

APRIL 30 TO JUNE 9  The story seems simple enough: a pair of young Americans journey to Uganda to perform missionary work for the Church of the Latter-Day Saints. But in the hands of South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone, The Book of Mormon becomes an utterly berserk, shockingly un-PC and uproariously funny romp. Though unafraid to satirize some of the more divisive cultural issues of our time, this multiple Tony Award winner is also an all-singing, all-dancing spectacle in the grandest Broadway tradition. Princess of Wales Theatre, Tuesday to Saturday 8 p.m., Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday 2 p.m., $59 to $200; call 416-872-1212 or visit mirvish.com for more information.  —Anna Marszalek

Feel the Rhythm as Stomp Returns to Toronto

Stomp Toronto Mirvish

The clangers and bangers of Stomp return to Toronto this April (photo: Steve McNicholas)

APRIL 16 TO 21  Your heartbeat won’t be the only pulse you feel when the explosive Stomp returns to Toronto for a limited engagement. Using matchboxes, broomsticks, garbage cans, hubcaps and more, each member of the eight-piece percussion troupe contributes their distinctive voice—truly becoming one with their everyday “instruments”—to build a cohesive and invigorating rhythm. After more than two decades on stages around the world, this unique physical-theatre staple remains a must-see show for audiences of all ages. Royal Alexandra Theatre, $25 to $99; call 416-872-1212 or click here for showtimes and to buy.  —Macrina Smart

Clybourne Park is Featured in the Off-Mirvish Theatre Series

A scene from Clybourne Park (photo: Mirvish Productions)

FEBRUARY 12 TO MARCH 3 You’ve heard of the edgier shows performed at New York’s “Off-Broadway” playhouses; Mirvish Productions is doing its best to foster that vibe in Toronto. The company recently began presenting its Off-Mirvish second-stage series of acclaimed indie-theatre favourites, including Bruce Norris’s Tony- and Pulitzer Prize-winning Clybourne Park. Loosely based on historical events, this response to the famed 1959 play A Raisin in the Sun uses humour to tackle tough questions of race and real estate. Panasonic Theatre, $29 to $79; call 416-872-1212 or visit TicketKing for showtimes and to buy.  —Ana Taveira

Hot Date: Andrew Lloyd Webber Takes Us Back to Oz

The Wizard of Oz cast welcomes you to the Emerald City (photo: Keith Pattison)

STARTS DECEMBER 20  Don your ruby slippers and follow the yellow brick road to see the great and powerful Andrew Lloyd Webber’s adaptation of The Wizard of Oz! Featuring all the beloved songs of the original film, plus new music by Webber and Tim Rice, the lavish production follows Dorothy and her dog, Toto, as they wander through a colourful land that is definitely not Kansas. The blockbuster show also introduces a new star to the city’s stage, with the lead role being cast as part of a TV reality program, Over the Rainbow. Ed Mirvish Theatre, $35 to $175; call 416-872-1212 or click here for more information and tickets.  —Ana Taveira

Hot Date: Jekyll & Hyde Offers a Tale of Two Men

Deborah Cox and Constantine Maroulis star in Jekyll & Hyde the Musical (photo: Smallz and Raskind)

NOVEMBER 14 TO 18  A dangerous love story is at the dark heart of Jekyll & Hyde the Musical, which gives the Broadway treatment to Robert Louis Stevenson’s chilling parable of alter egos and mental torment. Starring Tony nominee Constantine Maroulis as the titular split personality, and Grammy-nominated singer Deborah Cox, the gothic tale featuring bold, passionate songs is sure to be a crowd-pleaser in Toronto before moving on to New York next spring. Ed Mirvish Theatre, $29 to $150; call 416-872-1212 or visit here for showtimes and to buy.  —Ana Taveira

Hot Date: Backbeat and the Original Beatles

photo by Nobby Clark

JULY 21 TO SEPTEMBER 2 Relive the often-overlooked story of how five Liverpudlians went to Hamburg and soon after became the world’s greatest rock ‘n’ roll band. Backbeat follows the original members of The Beatles and the fractious relationships that eventually turned the quintet—John, Paul and George, yes, but also Pete Best and Stuart Sutcliffe—into the Fab Four we know today. Complete with early classics like “Love Me Do,” “Twist and Shout” and “Long Tall Sally,” this musical is a must for any Beatles fan. Royal Alexandra Theatre, Tuesday to Saturday 8 p.m., Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday 2 p.m., $36 to $130; call 416-872-1212 or click here for further details.

Hot Date: Join Pam Ann’s Mile-High Club

JUNE 21 & 22 It’s a non-stop flight to hilarity as celebrity airhostess Pam Ann makes a two-day layover in Toronto. This wise-crackin’ alter-ego of Australian comedienne Caroline Reid dons the high heels and big hairdo of air travel’s “golden age” for her one-woman show, entitled Around the World, which pokes campy fun at the travel industry and the experience of flying. Panasonic Theatre, 8 p.m., $35 to $55; call 416-872-1212 or click here for tickets.

Where in Toronto: Dancap Takes a Bow

Jersey Boys was Dancap's biggest hit (photo by Joan Marcus)

Last week Dancap Productions, which brought to Toronto Broadway hits such as Jersey Boys, announced that it would not present any programming for the 2013 season. This suspension of operations marks the end of an era (albeit a relatively short one), where two large theatre companies, Dancap and juggernaut Mirvish Productions, introduced audiences to big-time mainstream musicals and stage dramas. But don’t fret; though the scene just got a little smaller, there are still many exciting opportunities across the city for resident and visiting theatre enthusiasts alike. (more…)

Hot Date: Kathleen Turner Says the Drugs Don’t Work in High

photo by Larry Nagler

MAY 8 TO 13 A story of human frailty and the promise of redemption unfolds with devastating power as two-time Golden Globe winner Kathleen Turner steps onto the stage in High. In a critically acclaimed performance, Turner embodies Sister Jamison Connelly, who sponsors a teenage drug addict’s long and treacherous road to recovery. But in taking on the dual roles of rehab counselor and a woman of religious conviction, the nun finds her own faith sorely tested. Royal Alexandra Theatre, $50 to $150; call 416-872-1212 or visit here for showtimes and tickets.

Hot Date: Bring on a Cheery Premiere

photo by Joan Marcus

MAY 2 TO JUNE 3 It’s hip hip hooray for the fiercely funny, over-the-top high school rivalries at the heart of Bring It On: the Musical. Some of the most creative minds in theatre, including Jeff Whitty of Avenue Q fame, adapted the cult-favourite Kirsten Dunst film as a live—and very lively—look at the world of competitive cheerleading. Gravity-defying choreography, catchy hip-hop beats, colourful characters—there’s much to applaud in this collage of song, dance and pom-poms. Ed Mirvish Theatre, Tuesday to Saturday
8 p.m., Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday 2 p.m., $35 to $130; call 416-872-1212 or click here to purchase tickets.

Where in Toronto: Getting Back to the Theatre

Inside the Ed Mirvish Theatre

Each week, our intrepid interns reflect on life
and times in the big city.

When I think of theatre, I time-machine back to junior high, where I discovered an interest in acting. Encouraged by Ms. Olsen, who was as cool and as in-love-with-Shakespeare as drama teachers come, I auditioned for—and won—a role as a Men in Black–style agent in a ridiculous student-written play called Phlegm and Larry in the Search for Elvis (don’t ask). It was the complete opposite of classics like The Wizard of Oz and Annie that I had seen performed in previous years; of course it was an instant hit.

Unfortunately, after that successful debut, my play-acting ambitions largely took a backseat to academics. It was not until university—and a few courses on Shakespeare—that theater and I were truly reacquainted. In a class full of drama majors, I took comfort in at least knowing the difference between upstage and downstage and being able to identifying a soliloquy. But reading drama isn’t the same as watching it on stage. (more…)