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Hot Art

Hot Art: Aesthetic Reflection

“Going Nowhere” Courtesy of Jayne Nixon

“Going Nowhere” Courtesy of Jayne Nixon

Starts sep 15

Creative Quandary at cre8ery showcases a collection of work by local artists: Naomi Gerrard, Jayne Nixon, Deb Schmid and Kathleen Black. The exhibit focuses on the exploration of the creative and emotional processes an artist goes through when creating a work. Through a variety of mediums, each piece shows a moment significant to its artist. The collection includes lush landscape paintings illustrating the English countryside, intricate glass sculptures, glass mosaics (pictured), grain and seed works inspired by prairie land and colourful mixed media work influenced by travels to Asia. 2nd floor, 125 Adelaide St, 204‑944-0809

Hot Art: Fresh Prints

Acrylic paint, acrylic pouring medium, collage on panel, 16 x 20 inches by NEIL FARBER, COURTESY of LISA KEHLER ART + PROJECTS

Acrylic paint, acrylic pouring medium, collage on panel, 16 x 20 inches by NEIL FARBER, COURTESY of LISA KEHLER ART + PROJECTS

SEP 2-OCT 1 Neil Farber presents the first Canadian solo show of his work in more than a decade at Lisa Kehler Art + Projects. The Braided Stream includes a new series of colourful and textured paintings that feature his collages sealed between layers of clear acrylic paint. 171 McDermot Ave, 204‑510‑0099

Hot Art: Fibre Art

February 2016 Morton My Back YardThe Fabric of My Life: Fibre Art Collages by Bev Morton at Wayne Arthur Gallery showcases fibre art creations inspired by places the artist lives, works and dreams. Images of home and gallery, as well as real and imagined places, use distinct lines to define form and colour, with a simplicity that allows the viewer to participate in the experiences of the artist. Many of the pieces started as paintings, which were later recreated into fabric art. Runs Jan 31-Mar 2. Wayne Arthur Gallery, 186 Provencher Blvd, 204‑477‑5249

Hot Art: Fibre Art

February 2016 Morton My Back Yard

The Fabric of My Life: Fibre Art Collages by Bev Morton at Wayne Arthur Gallery showcases fibre art creations inspired by places the artist lives, works and dreams. Images of home and gallery, as well as real and imagined places, use distinct lines to define form and colour, with a simplicity that allows the viewer to participate in the experiences of the artist. Many of the pieces started as paintings, which were later recreated into fabric art. Runs Jan 31-Mar 2. Wayne Arthur Gallery, 186 Provencher Blvd, 204‑477‑5249

Hot Art: Art Exhibits Jan/Feb 2016

N 49º5_ W 97º1_2 Chantal DupasTo Jan 9 — From Bluffs to the Holler: Paintings by Neil Peter Dyck at Actual Gallery juxtaposes imagery from flat farmland to rugged mountains.

To Jan 31 — Manitoba Insights: The Ken Hughes Gift at Buhler Gallery features work from Manitoba artists.

Jan 7-Feb 13 — Catch The Indigenous Curator in Residence exhibition at aceartinc. Work by Niki Little in Enendaman | Anminigook explores the concept of authorship in contemporary Indigenous art.

Jan 8-Feb 19 — Bicycle Dérives: Exploring the Everyday Landscapes of Prairie Towns by Ted McLachlan at Martha Street Studio takes a panoramic view of rural communities and the fissures and seams that lie behind the façade of a town.

Jan 14-Feb 20 — Using photographic representations of domestic plants, Ashley Gillanders explores ideas about growth and time in Methods of Preservation at Gallery 1C03.

Feb 4- Mar 5 — See Learning about plants from a book from visual artist Chantal Dupas at Lisa Kehler Art + Projects, which includes two series of watercolours focused on documenting plant life.

Feb 5-16 — The Appearance of First Light by Ashleigh Dawn at cre8ery features paintings which represent new beginnings.

Feb 5-Mar 12 — Catch Cibola / The Shaman Exterminator: On the Trail of the Woodcraft Indians with the Buffalo Boy Scouts of America at Urban Shaman. This film explores the history of the Woodcraft Indian movement created by author and artist Ernest Thompson Seton.

Feb 17-Mar 19 —See the artwork from Manitoba’s northern schools in The Frontier School Division Juried Art Show at the Graffiti Gallery.

Hot Art: Northern Power

Francis ‘Mistigofer’ Turner courtesy Gerald KuehlA Sad Sort of Clean, Hydropower in Northern Manitoba at Mennonite Heritage Centre Gallery features photos, video and drawings of four hydro-affected communities at the north end of the transmission line. The visuals evoke beauty and destruction, gentleness and power, and show the impact made on communities and the environment every time we flick a switch. To Jan 23. 600 Shaftesbury Blvd, 204-888-6781

Hot Art: Editor’s Pick: Bird Lady’s Swan Song

TundraBird-002

In January the world lost a powerful creative force when influential and prolific pioneer of modern Inuit art Kenojuak Ashevak died at age 85. Ashevak’s distinctive, enchanting imagery has graced Canadian stamps and coins, earned honourary doctorates, a Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts, and the distinction of highest auction sale price of any Canadian print at $52,000 USD. Her final masterpiece,Tall Tundra Bird (pictured), is a stunning stonecut and stencil that fittingly features Ashevak’s favoured subject: a mythical and nearly supernatural bird. Nunavut Gallery is the place to see this very special artwork and many other resplendent Ashevak prints. 603 Corydon Ave, 204-478‑7233.

Hot Art: Haisla Artist Lyle Wilson at Bill Reid Gallery

"Octopus" by Lyle Wilson. Photos by Jenn Walton courtesy collection of the artist

“Octopus” by Lyle Wilson. Photos by Jenn Walton courtesy collection of the artist

Haisla artist Lyle Wilson is painting outside the lines—of traditional Northwest Coast art, that is. In Paint: The Painted Works of Lyle Wilson, his artwork finds form in traditionally stylized, yet playfully experimental, pieces. Find captivating works by the artist, such as “Octopus” (pictured), until Sep. 15 at Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art.—Jill Von Sprecken

National Aboriginal Day is June 21. Find out more information on celebrations in Vancouver.

Hot Art: Dutch Masterworks at the Vancouver Art Gallery

Balthasar van der Ast's "Untitled (Still Life with Peaches and Shells)." Photo by Jim Gorman courtesy Vancouver Art Gallery

“Untitled (Still Life with Peaches and Shells)” by Balthasar van der Ast. Photo by Jim Gorman courtesy Vancouver Art Gallery

If the Netherlands isn’t in your itinerary—and even if it is—take a trip to the Vancouver Art Gallery for Persuasive Visions: 17th Century Dutch and Flemish Masterworks and Contemporary Reflections (Jun. 15 to Sep. 15) to see works from the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. Find pieces from the Dutch Golden Age, including artist Balthasar van der Ast’s “Untitled (Still Life with Peaches and Shells)” (pictured), alongside contemporary art, for an exhibition that’s well worth the journey.—Jill Von Sprecken

Hot Art: Watery Landscapes at Art Beatus

"Shoal" by June Yun

“Shoal” by June Yun

For a dose of springtime serenity, visit Art Beatus to see cool, watery landscapes by Chinese-Canadian artist June Yun (to May 31). In Spring • Water, the Vancouver-based artist uses oils on canvas to explore water in its various forms and colours (“Shoal,” pictured). Look closely: continuing from her Lemon Traveling series, Yun’s paintings are sometimes accompanied by a tiny lemon. We love the playful pop of unexpected colour.—Jill Von Sprecken

Hot Art: Haute Hotels at the Vancouver Art Gallery

Portland's Ace Hotel. Photo by Jeremy Pelley © Ace Hotel Group

Portland’s Ace Hotel. Photo by Jeremy Pelley © Ace Hotel Group

Whether a backpacker or a five-star fan, every world traveller needs a place to rest and recharge. Explore the evolution of hotels, hostels and inns as social spaces during the Vancouver Art Gallery’s Grand Hotel (Apr. 13 to Sep. 15). The exhibition, which shares its name with the iconic 1932 Hollywood film, highlights the architecture, design and culture of travel lodgings from Portland to Berlin.—Kristina Urquhart

Hot Art: Dreamy Watercolours by Charles John Collings in Vancouver

Charles John Collings’ “Niagara, Above the Falls.” Exhibition at Uno Langmann Limited

If Hope at Dawn: Watercolours by Emily Carr and Charles John Collings at the Vancouver Art Gallery (to May 26) leaves you yearning for more, stop by Uno Langmann Limited to view additional pieces by the British-born Charles John Collings in a complementary self-titled exhibition (to Mar 31). The Canadian artist lent an ethereal quality to his landscapes by mixing the paint directly onto water-soaked paper (“Niagara, Above the Falls,” pictured). Dreamy, indeed.—Kristina Urquhart