• eat
  • shop
  • see
  • go
  • stay
  • daytrip
  • map
  • calendar
  • transport
  • weather
  • currency
  • tofrom

All across Canada

Things to Do in Toronto: Shows & Events in May 2016

THERE ARE ALWAYS SO MANY THINGS TO DO IN TORONTO. GET OUT AND ENJOY SOME OF THE MANY GREAT PERFORMANCES AND EVENTS TAKING PLACE THROUGHOUT THE CITY IN MAY!

Leviathan at Canada’s Wonderland is Canada’s tallest and biggest roller coaster

MAY 1  The country’s largest theme park, Canada’s Wonderland kicks off opening day with even more excitement to its lineup of rides with two new soaring interactive experiences: Skyhawk and Flying Eagles. The former is the first of its kind in North America, letting thrill seekers control their own cockpit by navigating 360 degree turns and inversions from 135 feet in the air, while the latter lets pint-sized pilots—along with a co-pilot—steer their own plane. Of course, the park’s 16 roller coasters, water park, two kids play areas, and midway games are among the other draws that make it the most visited seasonal amusement park in North America.

MAY 1 TO 3  Esteemed paleontologist Nizar Ibrahim speaks about the discovery of fossils belonging to the largest predatory dinosaur ever discovered as part of the National Geographic Live series.

MAY 2 AND 3  Canadian musician Lights, known for such songs as “February Air” and “Drive My Soul,” performs an acoustic show at The Danforth Music Hall with special guests DCF.

MAY 4 AND 5  The Toronto Symphony Orchestra presents Brahms Symphony 4 alongside a new work by John Adams with a violin solo.

MAY 6  A roster of Canadian and world champion figure skaters take part in Stars on Ice, including Patrick Chan, Meagan Duhamel and Eric Radford, Javier Fernández, Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir and Joannie Rochette among others.

MAY 7  Catch Canadian singer and songwriter Royal Wood at The Danforth Music Hall.

(more…)

Insider’s Scoop: Forged in Fire exhibit at Bytown Museum

By Chris Lackner

Parliament Hill was Forged in Fire.

Ottawa’s fiery past is explored in a new, historic exhibition at the Bytown Museum, located alongside the Rideau Canal’s arresting locks just below our political hub.

Reconstruction of Centre Block of Parliament showing surviving Parliamentary Library, 1916. Bytown Museum.

Reconstruction of Centre Block of Parliament showing surviving Parliamentary Library, 1916. Bytown Museum.

On the 100th anniversary of the 1916 burning of Canada’s Parliament, explore the mystery of its destruction – and the secrets of its resurrection. Forged in Fire: The Building and Burning of Parliament includes unique artifacts and images, including rare photos of Parliament’s construction. Who says politics is boring? Our capital was forged in drama and intrigue.

We spoke to Grant M. Vogl, Collections and Exhibitions Manager, for an insider’s scoop:

Q: What will surprise visitors about this exhibit?

A: I think people will be surprised to learn about the fire of West Block in 1897. Most Canadians would know the story of the fire of 1916. However, I’m certain that for many visitors, reading about and seeing original photos of the fire of 1897 will be something new. I’m also very excited that visitors will get to see some very rare photographs of the construction of the original Parliament Buildings from 1861.

Construction of Parliament Buildings, (south side of Centre Block), Ottawa, 1861. By Elihu Spencer, courtesy of Bytown Museum.

Construction of Parliament Buildings (south side of Centre Block), Ottawa, 1861. By Elihu Spencer, courtesy of Bytown Museum.

Q: Why is this exhibit important?  
A: As we reach the 100th anniversary of any occasion, such a key milestone, events such as the fire of 1916 start to move out of memory and into the realm of history. There are no more living witnesses to this event; much the same as with the First World War. Therefore, it is very important to continue to tell these stories, introduce the history to today’s generation and also to connect or re-connect with the descendants of those who witnessed the fire first hand who may remember stories surrounding it.

Fire of West Block of Parliament, 1897. Bytown Museum.

Fire of West Block of Parliament, 1897. Bytown Museum.

Q: What are your favourite artifacts from the exhibition?
A: My favourite artifact in the exhibition is also one of the smallest. It is a very rare, 3” x 3” albumen print depicting Parliament Hill, then known as Barrack Hill, taken from the Ottawa River in 1857. For most visitors, the Parliament Buildings are timeless, so to see a photograph of “the Hill” without those iconic buildings and instead Lt. Col. By’s military barracks, will seem strange. But it will also inform visitors about the history of the site before being chosen as the seat of government.

Parliament Building at Ottawa, 1862, newsprint, Bytown Museum.

Parliament Building at Ottawa, 1862, newsprint, Bytown Museum.

The exhibit continues to Oct. 31, 2016.

Ottawa’s Best Patios

By Chris Lackner

Find your place in the sun. Our guide to Ottawa’s best patios covers your best bets for sun, suds, sangria, vino and vitamin D.

The Social patio in the ByWard Market's Clarendon Court. Courtesy: Ottawa Tourism.

The Social patio in the ByWard Market’s Clarendon Court. Courtesy: Ottawa Tourism.

ByWard Market

Clarendon Court: Secluded and cobblestone, its four restaurant patios feel European; discover the magic behind the shops on Sussex Drive, between George and York Streets, including spots like The Social and Courtyard Restaurant. (The Social537 Sussex Dr., Courtyard Restaurant: 21 George St.)

Earl of Sussex Pub: The best sun and sud combo in the market. 431 Sussex Dr.

La Terrasse: This open-air, summer restaurant offers stunning views of the Rideau Canal and Parliament. Their extensive wine and cocktail list pair well with the sun. Try a “Colonel By” Mojito. He would have wanted it that way. Located in Fairmont Chateau Laurier, even the sunbeams feel more elegant at this seasonal patio. 1 Rideau St.

Earl of Sussex patio.

Earl of Sussex patio.

The Highlander Pub: A place to people watch with eyes on the market’s pedestrian traffic. 115 Rideau St.

Cornerstone Bar and Grill: This market hotspot is a place to be seen. 92 Clarence St.

Murray Street: This leafy patio screams romance. And the charcuterie, cheese boards and wine list will only help matters. 110 Murray St.

Métropolitain Brasserie: Steps away from the Chateau Laurier and Parliament. Grab a table or an outdoor sofa. 700 Sussex Dr.

La Terrasse patio at Chateau Laurier. Courtesy Ottawa Tourism.

La Terrasse patio at Chateau Laurier. Courtesy Ottawa Tourism.

Elgin and Sparks Streets

D’Arcy McGee’s: Spot Ottawa’s who’s who at this upscale watering hole named after a Father of Confederation44 Sparks St.

Fox and Feather: Terrific topside patio with a bird’s-eye view of the bustling Elgin strip. 283 Elgin St.

Pancho Villa: Pancho’s margaritas, daiquiris, sangrias and pina coladas are as big in size as they are in flavour. It might not be Cancún, but close your eyes on the sunny patio and it will feel mighty close. 361 Elgin St.

Pancho Villa's patio.

Pancho Villa’s patio.

The Glebe

Feleena’s Mexican Cantina: Sangria, anyone? 742 Bank St.

Irene’s Pub: Discover the hidden courtyard patio at this live music hotspot. 885 Bank St.

Little Italy

Pub Italia: Ireland enjoys a bit of Italy’s sun. 434 Preston St.

Pub Italia patio.

Pub Italia patio.

Westboro/Hintonburg

Tennessy Willems: Small but sublime. Come for the pizza, stay for the sunshine. 1082 Wellington St W.

Churchills: P is for patio… and Public House. 356 Richmond Rd.

Water View

Canal Ritz patio on the Rideau Canal.

Canal Ritz patio on the Rideau Canal.

Dow’s Lake: Three restaurant patios overlook the lake’s busy birds and boaters. Choose your own adventure between Malone’s Lakeside Grill, Baja Grill and Lago1001 Queen Elizabeth Dr.

Canal Ritz: This classy canal-side gem is boat traffic central. 375 Queen Elizabeth Dr.

Mill Street Brew Pub: Located near the Canadian War Museum on LeBreton Flats, this historic gristmill turned brewpub is also the perfect stop along the Ottawa River bike path. 555 Wellington St. 

Insider’s Scoop: Gold Rush! at Canadian Museum of History

By Chris Lackner

The Gold Rush! has come to Ottawa.

Haida box by Bill Reid, 1971. Courtesy Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Haida box by Bill Reid, 1971. Courtesy Royal BC Museum and Archives.

While you can’t get rich, you can check out the shiny new exhibit, Gold Rush! El Dorado in British Columbia, at the Canadian Museum of History, April 8 to January 2017.

For an Insider’s Scoop, we talked to John Willis, curator of economic history at the museum:

Q: What will surprise visitors about this exhibit?

A: The fact that such a gold rush, of massive proportions, occurred in Canada, on its West Coast, 50 years before the Klondike.

The fact that some were willing to travel so far in order to get the gold: some trekked overland the entire distance from (central) Canada; others came thousands of miles from Europe, China, and elsewhere in Eastern Canada (the Maritimes for example).

The distances that have to be travelled within B.C. on terrain that is both rugged and spectacular (this comes out in the videos) this will surprise and impress visitors.

The fact that one could make a living not by prospecting for gold but by selling to and living off those mining the gold.

town-web

This photo depicts the main street of Barkerville just before the 1868 fire that destroyed the town. Courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Q. Why is this exhibit important? 

A: First, it establishes the importance of the 1858 and 1862 gold rushes in the making of modern B.C. history. The era transformed indigenous societies and overturned the traditional fur economy of the Hudson Bay Company. In its wake came a new type of society devoted to exploiting land, natural resources, farmland; fostering trade and building cities. Through this exhibition the society of B.C. is trying to come to terms with its history. This includes the admission tragic errors made in the past vis-à-vis indigenous nations.

Second, the exhibit shows the importance of the larger Pacific sphere to the making of B.C. history especially in the gold rush era. What happened in California, Australia and Hong Kong had considerable bearing on how B.C. got roped into this gold rush economy.

Third, the exhibit touches on the quirks of human behaviour in a gold-rush setting. Men and women (but mainly men) travel by the tens of thousands to one destination or another intending to make it rich quick by mining the gold.  They are carried away by an enthusiasm for the riches promised by gold.  Men suffer from gold fever that sets them on a path to the gold fields, however distant. That path was referred in the newspaper of the day as a “highway to insanity.” As a collective mania, the psychology of gold fever does resemble the kind of up and down and sometimes foolish human behaviour associated with the stock market.

Wheel and flumes at the Davies claim on William’s Creek, 1867. Courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Wheel and flumes at the Davies claim on William’s Creek, 1867.
Courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Q: What are your favourite aspects of, or artifacts from, the exhibition?

A. I enjoy seeing the life size version of the B.C. Express company stagecoach that dates from the era and was used on the Cariboo Road. The vehicle is in excellent shape, it was lovingly restored in the late 1980s.  And it can’t help but conjure up images of the old west.  coachThe freight saddle or aparejo positioned in a display window opposite the stage coach belonged to a local hero, French-born Jean Caux, nicknamed Cataline.  It is interesting for it reminds us of the challenges of getting freight into and out of the rugged and mountainous B. C. interior.

There is an explicit recognition of things Chinese: a picture of Hong Kong harbour full of ships circa 1860, and later in the exhibition a display of exquisite Chinese artifacts (fan, game pieces, pipe, mud-treated silk garments, shoes etc.).

Turnagain Nugget is the largest existing gold nugget ever found in British Columbia: it weighs 1,642 grams (52 troy onces) and is approximately 4.2 cm high, 18.1 cm wide and 9.2 cm deep. Courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archive.

Turnagain Nugget is the largest existing gold nugget ever found in British Columbia: it weighs 1,642 grams (52 troy onces) and is approximately 4.2 cm high, 18.1 cm wide and 9.2 cm deep. Courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archive.

A huge and engaging painting,  Slim Jim or the Parson Takes the Pot,  shows a group of men playing a gambling game of cards. A probable con-man disguised as a priest has surprised his fellow players by winning the hand. The picture reminds us that all forms of gambling were popular in gold-rush communities, where there were men (only) and money a plenty.

The painting is so big that the box in which it came barely fits, height-wise, in the corridor of our museum

Finally the Pemberton dress, a beautiful silk-dress, with its budding hoop skirt and delicate engagements (frills that go up the sleeves), which dates from the B.C. gold-rush era, reminds us that women were present in this society — as entrepreneurs, supporters of culture, as instigators of all kinds of business and community activities. The theme is well carried in the book by New Perspectives on the Gold Rush; as well as in the exhibition catalogue: Gold Rush! El Dorado in British Columbia.

Hot Shopping for April

Editor’s Choice

web Acadian-Maple-SyrupIt’s the time of year when nature produces its sweet treat of sap, which is turned into maple syrup. And Acadian Maple (page 50) on Peggy’s Cove Road in Upper Tantallon has all kinds of maple-flavoured treats. The former hobby farm now produces numerous gourmet maple goodies, including butter, brittle, wine, barbecue sauce, and, of course, pure syrup. The space is also available for bus tours or events.

 


Chocolate & confections

web 04_rousseau_2014

Head down to Rousseau Chocolatier on Hollis Street to watch as the team creates handmade chocolates, gourmet brownies, French macarons, and artisanal chocolate bars. But don’t leave without some sweet treats in hand. The chocolates are made in small batches and with real fruit and natural ingredients. Or stay in and enjoy a cold drink, cup of fair-trade coffee or mug of house hot chocolate.
Sugar Shok Candy Boutiqueon Portland Street in Dartmouth is as colorful and fun on the inside as it is on the outside. In this funky store, find more than 50 types of bulk candy, along with greeting cards, magnets, home décor, and ice cream.

Breaking News

web atlantic news dusk 1

 

Readers of news and current events will enjoy an afternoon at Atlantic News on Morris Street. Search the racks of magazines, newspapers and periodicals that cover countless topics and regions around the world. Look for titles on music, sports, crafts, religion, and more. It’s a readers’ utopia.

Just for the kids

web Halikids 2
Situated on South Park Street, is a boutique designed just for kids. Parents will have just as much fun as their kids will when shopping for high-quality clothes, toys, games, linens and more. Find traditional favourites
such as scooters and trains, plus educational toys, including science and detective kits.

 

 

 

All about art

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Art 1274 Hollis is a downtown collective of 24 artists showcasing their art in various media. Learn about emerging and established talent in the region. Peruse pottery, watercolours, stone, jewelry, and contemporary pieces.
Carrefour Atlantic & The Puffin Gallery in the Historic Properties features literature, original art, and traditional handcrafts from artists from Atlantic Canada, the Canadian North, and First Nations artists. It’s an eclectic mix of colourful and unique works by Canadian talents.

Strange days

web Strange-GN
Fans of comics and all things sci-fi and fantasy must visit Strange Adventures on Prince Street in Halifax and in downtown Dartmouth on Portland Street. Look for classic titles like X-Men, the Amazing Spiderman, and Captain America, alongside the hottest new graphic novels. The huge selection also includes toys, board games, card games, clothing, and more.

 

Hot Art: Cultural Significance

In Méthodologie pour touristes (Methodology for tourists) at La maison des artistes visuels francophones, artist Mathieu Léger explores themes of territory, boundaries and survival which contribute to the construction of an identity. Through photographs and video, the artist integrates himself into places he visits seeking to conjure a territory’s culture. March 3 to April 9, 2016, 340, Provencher Blvd, 204‑233‑8972, Map 1: P-6

Hot Art: Fibre Art

February 2016 Morton My Back YardThe Fabric of My Life: Fibre Art Collages by Bev Morton at Wayne Arthur Gallery showcases fibre art creations inspired by places the artist lives, works and dreams. Images of home and gallery, as well as real and imagined places, use distinct lines to define form and colour, with a simplicity that allows the viewer to participate in the experiences of the artist. Many of the pieces started as paintings, which were later recreated into fabric art. Runs Jan 31-Mar 2. Wayne Arthur Gallery, 186 Provencher Blvd, 204‑477‑5249

September Hot Shopping

womens-houdini-jacket-24145-500px-500px

By Suzanne Rent

Outdoors is in

Hit the great outdoors this fall in style with attire from Patagonia on Lower Water Street. Besides jackets, shoes, and shirts and pants for men and women, there is also gear for fly-fishing, diving, and camping. Get the kids suited up in their own right-sized gear, too.

TEA FOR TWO

  • Tea drinkers will love the assortment of loose tea at World Tea House at its two locations, on Argyle Street and in Sunnyside Mall in Bedford. All of its teas are fair trade, organic, and sold in biodegradable and recyclable materials. In stock are fresh teas such as black, green, herbals, white oolong, and rooibos. Teaware such as tea makers, tea presses, and tea infusers will help complete your collection.
  • Sawadee Tea House on Granville Street carries more than 375 premium teas from around the world. Owner Mie Mie Sein uses her vast knowledge of tea to create special blends for clients looking for tea for medicinal purposes. Sawadee’s loose teas are of high quality and fair trade. Many of the teas here come from Mie Mie’s own farm in the Annapolis Valley.

 

Editor’s ChoiceScreen Shot 2015-09-02 at 12.49.51 PM

If you love the mystical side of life, visit Into the Mystic on Cole Harbour Road in Dartmouth. Shop for gemstones, jewellery, herbal teas, pendulums, and tarot cards. If you can’t find what you want in store, the staff will help you order it in. After you shop, stay for a cup of tea and psychic reading, infrared treatment, aura scan, astrology, or numerology report.

 

Shop ’til you drop

Located in the heart of Bedford, Bedford Place Mall on the Bedford Highway is a community centre with more than 60 shops and services. A mix of anchor stores includes fashion retailers such as Suzy Shier and Tan Jay. Newly renovated with a fresh look and spacious food court area.

Just off the major highways connecting Dartmouth and Burnside, Dartmouth Crossing is an accessible one-stop-shopping destination for everyone in the family. In the centre are the Village Shops, a unique mix of boutiques, restaurants, and complete with a playground and amphitheatre, this space has a main street feel with plenty of parking.

Screen Shot 2015-09-02 at 12.57.10 PM

FALL INTO FASHION

A mainstay of designer fashion in Halifax, Foreign Affair on Barrington Street and Spring Garden Road, has the hottest fall fashions for women. Find all the latest brands, including Paige Denim, Mackage, Rebecca Taylor, and Vince.

Samuel & Co. in Park Lane, Halifax Shopping Centre, and Mic Mac Mall, has the best in casual, career, weekend, and evening styles for women. Brands include Silver Jeans, Mexx, Tribal, Frank Lyman, The North Face, and Helly Hansen.Screen Shot 2015-09-02 at 1.09.28 PM

Hot shopping in July!

By Suzanne Rent

BEAUTY BRANDS

Aritzia-2Brand new to Halifax, Aritzia in the Halifax Shopping Centre is the go-to place for fashionistas who love excellent design, top quality and great prices. Featured brands include Talula, Community, Le Fou, La Notte, The Castings and Auxiliary.

Aritzia-4

 

CATCH OF THE DAY

IM000043    salmon-fillets

For a fresh feed of lobster (live, packed for travel, or boiled and ready for a picnic), visit Fisherman’s Market International Inc. on the Bedford Highway. The bountiful Atlantic seafood also includes snow crab, halibut, oysters, scallops, shrimp or other delicacies from the Atlantic. There’s also smoked salmon or mackerel, and novelty items such as hats, mugs and hoodies. If you’re headed home, drop into Clearwater at Halifax Stanfield International Airport to pick up some freshly packed lobster for the trip. Grab all the condiments and accessories you need for a delicious souvenir to enjoy when you arrive home. (Also an ideal gift for house-sitters.)

 

FOR WHAT ALES YOU

Organic_Ale_341

The Garrison Beer Store located at Garrison Brewing on
Marginal Road is the place to pick up one of the acclaimed brews from a
granddaddy of the Halifax craft-beer scene. Find bottled beer, growlers
and party kegs. Or get a “Mixed 6” of your favourite flavours. You can
even try a sample before you purchase.

At the Prop Shop inside Propeller Brewing Company on
Gottingen Street or Windmill Road, find all the beer gear you need, such
as hats, t-shirts, hoodies, and glasses. And of course, there’s beer too, in
single-serve bottles, six packs, bombers and growlers.

 

 

OFF TO MARKET

Seaport

With more than 250 vendors, the Halifax Seaport Farmers’ Market on Marginal Road has the best offerings of the season and the city in one stop. There is fresh produce from local farms, fish caught from local waters, Nova Scotian wine and craft beer, and wares produced by artisans from around the province. Just a short Halifax Transit ferry ride away from downtown Halifax is the Alderney Landing Farmers’ Market on Ochterloney Street in Dartmouth. Open Saturday and Sundays, this indoor market offers everything from baked goods and produce, arts and crafts and homemade fudge.

 

FLOWER POWER

pots

Bring the best blossoms of summer inside with an arrangement from Props Floral Design in The Hydrostone neighbourhood on Young Street. Or sign up for a class to learn to make your own custom creations. For flowery summer gift ideas, visit My Mother’s Bloomers (page 70) in Spring Garden Place (page 73) on Spring Garden Road. Owner Neville MacKay brings to his store a lively, colourful and fresh array of blossoms that can be made into custom arrangements for any occasion. Choose from roses, orchids, lilies, or any flower of the season.

Editor’s Choice

The Pier 21 Gift Shop inside the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 on Marginal Road carries a lot more than travel souvenirs of the city. Choose one of the many books or DVDs that share the stories of immigrant life and Canada’s “gateway of hope.” Exclusive gifts include a sculpted and hand-painted authentic re-creation of Pier 21 by Catherine Karnes, plus “Pier into your past” commemorative plate.Pier-21-3

June Hot Dining

By Janice Hudson

PATIO PERFECTION

IMG_0400

• Catch some rays on the rooftop patio at Your Father’s Moustache on Spring Garden Road. The fun and lively space has beer aplenty on tap, including three signature brews from the RockBottom Brewpub downstairs.
• Downtown, head to The Maxwell’s Plum on Grafton Street for a cold pint on the sunny patio. The landmark bar has the city’s largest selection of draft beer, including top selections from Maritime craft breweries like Halifax’s Garrison Brewing and Cape Breton’s Big Spruce.
• For fabulous views of Halifax harbour, check out Gahan House in the Historic Properties. This popular Prince Edward Island brewpub recently opened its first Nova Scotia location, serving its own line of handcrafted beers. Try the Beach Chair lager for a refreshing summer sip.

Editor’s Choice

Steak9246Two downtown restaurants have once again earned the prestigious CAA/AAA Four Diamond Award.
Recognized for the eighth year in a row, Onyx on Argyle Street is a sleek resto bar showcasing local ingredients in delicious globally inspired recipes. Cut Steakhouse on Lower Water Street has received the award every
year since opening in 2008. The menu boasts premium beef (dry-aged and butchered on-site) with
an artful wine list and inventive sides.

 

 

VEGGIES FIRST

IMG_0132

• A leader in Halifax’s emerging vegan scene, Envie touts a menu of hearty meals like vegan ribs, grilled cheese and indulgent raw desserts. Catering to dietary restrictions, the menu is 90 per cent gluten free. Find the stylish restaurant on the corner of Agricola and Charles streets in the North End.
• In the West End on Windsor Street, Wild Leek has made-from-scratch vegan comfort food. Chef Kirsten Haggart whips up recipes like mac’n cheese, seitan sandwich, and the popular coconutbacon “CBLT.” Wash it down with a fresh-squeezed juice and save room for gourmet cupcake.

 

CREATIVE CORNERSTONEGio-Tea--024---Version-2

Downtown at Gio on
Market Street, Chef Bee Choo
Char gives traditional recipes
an inventive new twist. Her
delicious version of poutine
includes fried polenta fingers
topped with duck confit, red
wine jus and blue “Cheez
Whiz.” Open for lunch and
dinner, Gio has a sommelierchosen
wine list plus creative cocktails and martinis.

 

SLICE OF SUCCESS

_MG_4104Specializing in wood-fired pizza, Morris East won bronze in the non-traditional category at the recent International Pizza Expo in Las Vegas. Its Nova Scotia-inspired winning pie featured pears poached in Blomidon Estate Baco Noir and prosciutto from Halifax’s Ratinaud Charcuterie. Visit in downtown Halifax on Morris Street and in Bedford on Larry Uteck Boulevard.

June Hot Shopping

By Suzanne Rent

HOMESPUN STYLE

Lost cod 1

The Lost Cod in the Historic Properties on Lower Water Street will help you create clothes with Nova Scotia-inspired designs. Pick from a stock of logo designs that represent a vast swath of Nova Scotia’s commercial and cultural past (including beloved throwback sports logos like the Nova Scotia Voyageurs, Sydney Millionaires and Halifax Windjammers). Then, choose a garment, size and colour and you have your own summer style inspired by the province’s rich history. Great for gifts, too.

MADE FOR MEN

Duggers

 

• Men looking to update their summer wardrobe can stop into Duggers on Spring Garden Road. Find exclusive brands such as Hugo Boss, Canali, Coppley, Sand and Van Gils. Or visit D2 on the main level for the latest summer trends in men’s style.
• At Colwell’s in the Historic Properties on Lower Water Street, find all the basics such as dress shirts, pants, sports jackets, jeans and t-shirts.

 

 

 

 

FRESH FASHIONj&r-grimsmo-1-copy

• J&R Grimsmo Boutique on Barrington Street carries gorgeous styles for women, all ethically manufactured, made with sustainable materials and processes, but some of the best designers in North America. Find dresses, tops and bottoms and lots of accessories for any summer outing.
• For casual styles for those active shoppers on the go, try Olsen Europe in Park Lane and Mic Mac Mall. Produced in Hamburg, Germany, these styles are modern, fresh and available in a variety of colours for the season.
• At Wildflower Clothing Inc. on Clyde Street, owner Jill Strong finds styles that are like the comfort food of clothing that work for women looking for no-fuss styles. Accessorize with hats, belts, scarves or handbags.

ONE-STOP SHOP

SunnysideSunnyside Mall on Bedford Highway
is home to various retailers from around the
region. Shop for summer fashions at Turbine
or Moe’s Menswear, accessories at Peoples
Jewellers and something for the kids at Bib ’N Tucker.

 

 

BRILLIANT BLING

Frida Dress up your best outfit with custom jewellery from Frida in Bishop’s Landing on Lower Water
Street. There are styles from Canadian and European designers, and various collections highlighting gemstones and diamonds. Book a consultation to help create your own piece of wearable art.
• At Fireworks Gallery on Barrington Street, in-house goldsmiths and gem masters create unique Old World designs in gold, silver and platinum using New World techniques.

Work with one of these masters on
creating a design that tells your
personal story.

 

 

Editor’s Choice

sweet-pea_trends11Summer is the season for dresses and Sweet Pea Boutique on Queen Street has a huge selection of summer frocks for every occasion. Find dresses, rompers or jumpers with flowers, stripes, lace, all perfect for tea parties, weddings or a summer night on the town.

Hollywood North

By LAURA DENNIS

The Marine Building: Fantastic Four, Blade: Trinity, Watchmen, Life or Something Like It, Timecop, Battle in Seattle

The Marine Building: Fantastic Four, Blade: Trinity, Watchmen, Life or Something Like It, Timecop, Battle in Seattle (Photo: KK Law)

  

Vancouver Convention Centre: Robocop, Mission Impossible - Ghost Protocol, The A-Team, Human Target, The Killing, Godzilla (Photo: KK Law)

Vancouver Convention Centre: Robocop, Mission Impossible – Ghost Protocol, The A-Team, Human Target, The Killing, Godzilla (Photo: KK Law)

Vancouver Art Gallery: Night at the Museum, X-Men: The Last Stand, Continuum, Arrow, The X-Files, MacGyver

Vancouver Art Gallery: Night at the Museum, X-Men: The Last Stand, Continuum, Arrow, The X-Files, MacGyver (Photo: Lilly3/Stockphoto.com)

Vancouver Public Library: Double Jeopardy, Stargate SG-1, The Dead Zone, Smallville, Mr. Magoo (Photo: DannyC23/Stockphoto.com)

Vancouver Public Library: Double Jeopardy, Stargate SG-1, The Dead Zone, Smallville, Mr. Magoo (Photo: DannyC23/Stockphoto.com)

While strolling through downtown, you may feel the persistent tingle of déjà vu. Don’t worry: the architecture seems eerily familiar because for over a century, Vancouver has been used as a skilled stunt double in film. The city, which can replicate anywhere from Seattle to Mumbai to outer space, can be credited with many pivotal scenes in cinematic history. Vancouver follows Los Angeles and New York as the third-largest film production centre in the world—there is a catalogue of 20,000 locations for filmmakers to choose from. Check out the Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver Convention Centre, Marine Building or Vancouver Public Library for a souvenir shot, and keep your eyes peeled for the many movies and TV shows currently in production. You might even make the blooper reel.